Arizona Legislator Proposes Securing State Reserves with Gold and Silver

First published by Money Metals here:
https://www.moneymetals.com/news/2019/01/22/arizona-silver-gold-reserve-fund-001701

An Arizona legislator has put forward a bill to de-risk the state’s financial holdings with a modest allocation to physical gold and silver in the state’s reserve fund.

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The Silver Price and Broader Markets

First published by Money Metals here:
https://www.moneymetals.com/news/2019/01/22/the-silver-price-and-broader-markets-001700

What’s in store for silver and the broader markets this week? If we look at the moving averages and what is taking place in the broader markets, we may find some clues. It seems as if the silver price over the past two weeks has been moving in the opposite direction of the Dow Jones Index and the broader markets.

$GLD and $SLV Prices as of January 21 2019 @moneymetals

January 21, 2019 — Gold and silver prices fell last week, under pressure from a rising dollar and strength once again in the equity markets.

After a miserable finish to 2018, stocks are off to one of the strongest starts to a year ever recorded. Retail investors may be having some trouble keeping up with the whipsaw action.

The partial government shutdown, which began Dec. 22nd, will be a month-old tomorrow – the longest ever. The prior record was set in 1995-1996 when President Bill Clinton refused to sign a Republican spending bill which promised to reduce expenditures.

At the moment, there is little sign the current impasse will be ending soon. Democrats appear unwilling to compromise, even after President Donald Trump offered them a DACA extension over the weekend.

Political pressure is mounting as 800,000 federal employees have now missed one payroll (but will invariably receive back pay eventually).

Although federal employees generally receive very high salaries, if those workers are similar to the average American with regard to personal savings, they won’t have much cash to cover living expenses. They will instead be borrowing money and/or seeking other assistance.

Most Americans however, are unaffected by the shutdown thus far. The stock markets certainly aren’t reflecting any concern either – and it’s quite possible stock prices have actually been boosted by a less active federal government.

Check out live precious metals prices here:
https://goo.gl/gy5XMA

$GLD and $SLV Prices as of January 21 2019 @moneymetals

January 21, 2019 — Gold and silver prices fell last week, under pressure from a rising dollar and strength once again in the equity markets.

After a miserable finish to 2018, stocks are off to one of the strongest starts to a year ever recorded. Retail investors may be having some trouble keeping up with the whipsaw action.

The partial government shutdown, which began Dec. 22nd, will be a month-old tomorrow – the longest ever. The prior record was set in 1995-1996 when President Bill Clinton refused to sign a Republican spending bill which promised to reduce expenditures.

At the moment, there is little sign the current impasse will be ending soon. Democrats appear unwilling to compromise, even after President Donald Trump offered them a DACA extension over the weekend.

Political pressure is mounting as 800,000 federal employees have now missed one payroll (but will invariably receive back pay eventually).

Although federal employees generally receive very high salaries, if those workers are similar to the average American with regard to personal savings, they won’t have much cash to cover living expenses. They will instead be borrowing money and/or seeking other assistance.

Most Americans however, are unaffected by the shutdown thus far. The stock markets certainly aren’t reflecting any concern either – and it’s quite possible stock prices have actually been boosted by a less active federal government.

Check out live precious metals prices here:
https://goo.gl/gy5XMA

Originally Posted Here: $GLD and $SLV Prices as of January 21 2019 @moneymetals

Find the Cheapest Precious Metals Products in the “Bargain Bin”

First published by Money Metals here:
https://www.moneymetals.com/news/2019/01/21/find-the-cheapest-precious-metals-products-001699

Privately made bars and rounds, as opposed to government issue coins, are hard to beat when it comes to low premiums. About the only way to lower costs even further is to make some compromises when it comes to condition. It is possible to buy scratched, dented, and/or tarnished items at a discount. Investors who don’t care much about aesthetics, or don’t mind cleaning tarnished items, can get more precious metal for their dollars.

The Bullish Case for Platinum Coins or Platinum Bars

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Originally Posted Here: The Bullish Case for Platinum Coins or Platinum Bars

The Bullish Case for Platinum Coins or Platinum Bars

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Global Silver Production May Decline More Than Analysts Forecasts

First published by Money Metals here:
https://www.moneymetals.com/news/2019/01/21/global-silver-production-may-decline-more-than-analysts-forecasts-001698

The global mine supply from the top silver producing countries may decline more than the industry forecasts. The leading consultancies reported that global silver production would increase moderately by 1-2% in 2018. However, the data from several countries and large mining companies suggest that overall world silver production may decline by 2-3+%.

U.S. Government Debt Bomb Higher Than Americans Realize

First published by Money Metals here:
https://www.moneymetals.com/news/2019/01/18/us-govt-debt-bomb-higher-than-americans-realize-001697

The U.S. Federal debt bomb continues to increase, even with the government shut down. In just one day, the U.S. public debt increased $50 billion on Jan 15th. While the total outstanding Federal debt has now reached nearly $22 trillion, it doesn’t include all U.S. government debt.